Sweet Potato Soufflé

Food

This silky sweet potato soufflé is made with baked sweet potatoes and warm spices for an easy to make side dish or dessert that’s perfect for fall.

Sweet Potato Souffle with Whip Cream foodiecrush.com

Sweet Potato Souffle with Whip Cream foodiecrush.com

I have no shortage of Thanksgiving side dish recipe ideas because let’s be honest, they’re the real Thanksgiving heroes. My mom’s classic stuffing, the best mashed potatoes, and my easy glazed carrots are the sides I make every year that keeps them coming back for more. This soufflé is just one of them.

This sweet potato soufflé tastes more like a pumpkin or sweet potato pie minus the crust than the typical fluffy soufflé. Isn’t the filling everyone’s favorite anyway? It skips the fussiness of having to separate the eggs or whip any stiff peaks, and instead, everything is mixed in a food processor or blender at once, making it totally simple and quick to make.

Sweet Potato Souffle Ingredients foodiecrush.com

Sweet Potato Souffle Ingredients foodiecrush.com

What’s in Sweet Potato Soufflé

This sweet potato soufflé is one of the very first recipes I made once I was in charge of Thanksgiving dinner. It’s also one of the very first I published here on the blog—a yam soufflé I adapted from Cooking Light Magazine (RIP) years ago. Over the years, I’ve changed the recipe quite a bit. Could I cut back on the butter a bit? I could. Use baked sweet potatoes instead of canned yams? Now we’re talking.

Here’s what you’ll need for this dish:

  • Sweet potatoes—fresh is best. I used to make this with canned yams and while it was super yummy, I’ve since found using baked fresh sweet potatoes make a flavor difference.
  • Butter—Be sure it’s softened so it mixes in well.
  • Eggs—You can’t have a soufflé without eggs. These work as a binder for the sweet potatoes and give the soufflé its signature lift.
  • Half and half—Adds a creamy richness. Use cream if you want something even richer, or whole milk if you want it to be a bit lighter.
  • Light brown sugar—Dark brown sugar works here too, and provides a deeper flavor.
  • Nutmeg—I prefer fresh nutmeg grated with my handy spice microplane, but ground will work.
  • Cinnamon—Saigon cinnamon is a favorite.
  • Cornstarch—it’s just a small amount, but don’t skip it, as it helps stabilize the soufflé.

Sweet Potato Souffle in ramekins foodiecrush.com

Sweet Potato Souffle in ramekins foodiecrush.com

How to Make Sweet Potato Soufflé

Bake the sweet potatoes. You can get my full rundown on baked sweet potatoes here, or here are the CliffsNotes version: Place the potatoes on a foil-lined baking sheet, whole with the skin on, and roast for 50 minutes to 1 hour (depending on the size), or until soft and the peels are papery and pulling away from the flesh. Cool until you can easily peel the jackets from the potatoes, then discard the peel.

Whip it good. Add all of the ingredients to a food processor or blender, and whip everything together until smooth (you can do this in batches if necessary).

Fill the baking dishes. This recipe can be made in lightly buttered individual ramekins or a 1-quart baking dish for your lovely dinner crowd. If you choose the ramekin route, fill them quite full. The soufflé does deflate quite a bit upon cooling.

Sweet Potato Souffle foodiecrush.com

Sweet Potato Souffle foodiecrush.com

How to Tell When the Soufflé Is Done

I heed these three signs that the soufflé is done baking:

  1. Puffed and domed, the top of the soufflé may have cracked just a bit.
  2. The soufflé has pulled away and separated from the edge of the baking dish.
  3. The center is springy to the touch.

The soufflé will deflate as it cools. Serve this dish warm, or at room temperature.

If serving at room temperature, this dish can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 3 days ahead of serving.

Sweet Potato Souffle with spoon foodiecrush.com

Sweet Potato Souffle with spoon foodiecrush.com

What’s the Difference Between Soufflé and Casserole?

The soufflé is an eye-catching, show-stopping dish. The wonderfully light and airy dish contains whipped eggs for lift and originated in France in the mid 17th century in more of a savory iteration, as an omelette soufflé. The sometimes sweet, sometimes savory dish endured a renaissance during the 1960s as an impressive dish for dinner guests. It’s basically timeless.

Casseroles are a different animal. While comforting and delicious, they’re more humble in their appearance and don’t usually don’t contain eggs unless they’re needed as a binder. Comforting and cozy, they’re almost always topped with a hearty sprinkling of cheese and sometimes bread crumbs, or even onion rings. Yeah, I went there.

Sweet Potato Souffle with Whip Cream foodiecrush.com

Sweet Potato Souffle with Whip Cream foodiecrush.com

How to Serve the Soufflé

Serve this soufflé warm or at room temperature with:

  • Plain and all on its own
  • Whip cream or crème fraîche, spiked with a bit of bourbon and vanilla
  • Sprinkle with chopped walnuts or toasted pecans
  • Vanilla bean ice cream is always a tasty topper no matter the dessert
  • Bacon bits with a drizzle of caramel or maple syrup adds a savory touch

What to Serve With This Soufflé

If you make this recipe, please let me know! Leave a ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ rating on this recipe below and leave a comment, take a photo and tag me on Instagram with #foodiecrusheats.

Sweet Potato Souffle with Whip Cream foodiecrush.com

Sweet Potato Souffle with Whip Cream foodiecrush.com

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Sweet Potato Soufflé

This silky sweet potato soufflé is made with baked sweet potatoes and warm spices for an easy to make side dish or dessert that’s perfect for fall.

Course Dessert

Cuisine American

Keyword sweet potato souffle

Prep Time 5 minutes

Cook Time 1 hour 40 minutes

Total Time 1 hour 45 minutes

Servings 8

Calories 302kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 pound sweet potatoes , about 2 cups cooked
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter , softened
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 cup light brown sugar
  • 1 cup half and half
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1/2 teasoon kosher salt

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 400°F.

  • Place the sweet potatoes on a foil-lined baking sheet, whole with the skin on, and roast for 50 minutes to 1 hour (depending on the size), or until soft and the peels are papery and pulling away from the flesh. Cool until you can easily peel the jackets from the potatoes, then discard the peel.

  • Reduce the oven temperature to 350°F. Add all of the ingredients to the food processor and whip everything together until smooth (you can do this in batches if necessary).

  • Divide the mixture between eight 1/2 cup ramekins or a 1 qt. baking dish, being careful not to over-fill. Place ramekins on a sheet pan and bake in the oven for about 40 minutes. When done, the soufflés should rise high and slightly pull away from the baking pan edges. The soufflés will deflate as they cool. Serve warm or at room temperature. Refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Notes

Adapted from Cooking Light, September 1996

While I bake the soufflé in individual ramekins, a baking dish works well for passing round to your lovely dinner crowd. If you choose the ramekin route, fill them quite full, the soufflé does deflate quite a bit upon cooling.

This would be excellent served with a crème fraîche or sour cream-spiked whipped cream, as well as some toasted pecans.

Nutrition

Calories: 302kcal | Carbohydrates: 40g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 14g | Saturated Fat: 8g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 4g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 116mg | Sodium: 108mg | Potassium: 302mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 29g | Vitamin A: 8533IU | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 89mg | Iron: 1mg

Sweet Potato Souffle with Whip Cream foodiecrush.com

Sweet Potato Souffle with Whip Cream foodiecrush.com

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