Mango Chicken Curry

Food

This Mango Chicken Curry has a robust flavor, erring on the side of more sweet than spicy. The “secret” to this delicious curry? Blending mango in the coconut curry sauce and then adding even more mango to the finished dish! 

Try some of our other popular curries — this Yellow Chicken CurryChickpea Curry, or Sweet Potato Coconut Curry Soup.

Overhead image of the Mango Chicken Curry

Overhead image of the Mango Chicken Curry

Mango Chicken Curry

The more uses I can find for mango, the better. It’s easily my favorite fruit so I’ll add it into whatever I can — sweet or savory! And since chicken curry is one of the go-to meals at my home, I decided mango needed to make an appearance in it. 

I started with my favorite Coconut Curry Chicken recipe and took some inspiration from this recipe by Elise at Simply Recipes. A little bit of trial and error and I couldn’t be more excited with the outcome and to share this recipe!

Process shots-- images of the veggies being sautéed, and the garlic, ginger, seasonings, and curry paste being added

Process shots-- images of the veggies being sautéed, and the garlic, ginger, seasonings, and curry paste being added

Let’s chat mangoes

  • We love honey mangos (also known as Ataulfo or yellow mangoes) best in this Mango Chicken Curry, but regular mangoes work great as well. (Honey mangos are sweeter and creamier than regular mangos.)
  • To tell if mangos are ripe, squeeze them gently. If it’s ripe, it will give slightly. Mangos get softer as they ripen and will continue to ripen after you bring them home from the store. Keep not-quite-ripe (slightly firm) mangos at room temperature and they’ll continue to ripen. Once they’re to the perfect ripeness, you can move them to the fridge to slow down the ripening process.
  • For a sweeter curry sauce, wait until the mangos are at peak ripeness. For a less sweet (more spicy) curry sauce, use a slightly more firm mango.
  • We’ve tested this recipe with frozen mangos and had great results with them. Frozen mangos are pretty good — they are always picked when ripe, just not at their peak ripeness (they’d get too mushy when frozen and defrosted). But when you can’t always count on finding fresh, ripe mangos at the store, you can count on frozen ones being ripe enough to give this curry great flavor and sweetness.
  • Here’s a quick and helpful visual guide on how to cut a mango.

QUICK TIP

I love buying a flat of mangoes from Costco (usually 6-8 in the tray) and using them throughout the week for snacks or in recipes. If you do the same thing, use a few of the mangos in this curry and the leftovers in some of our other favorite mango recipes: this Mango Salad, Mango SorbetMango Smoothie, Mango Chicken, or Mango Salsa.

Process shots of the Mango Chicken curry-- the mango being added and sautéed, and then the coconut milk being added; transferring to a blender

Process shots of the Mango Chicken curry-- the mango being added and sautéed, and then the coconut milk being added; transferring to a blender

Mango Chicken Curry Tips

  • It can be overwhelming to navigate coconut milk in the grocery store. Look for shelf-stable, not refrigerated, cans of coconut milk. You’ll find canned coconut milk on the international aisle, with Latin or Asian products. Here’s an article outlining the best brands to use. I personally use Imperial Kitchen® since I can find it often at my local grocery store. Use full-fat coconut milk for the best flavor and thickness. Lite coconut milk won’t thicken and give you the rich, full flavor that regular coconut milk will. Cream of coconut is far too sweet and coconut cream tends to be too thick (and overpoweringly coconut flavored) for this curry.
  • Take time to sauté the spices. Instead of immediately dumping all the ingredients into the pot, we want to take time to sauté the curry paste and seasonings. This creates a more heightened flavor dimension.
  • When blending, make sure to secure the lid on tightly and then select the “soup” or “hot” cycle. Remember that heat expands, so increase speed slowly and watch it carefully to avoid soup exploding out or over. Remove the lid carefully as it will likely release a burst of steam. If your blender doesn’t have a hot/soup setting, you can compensate by replacing the blender lid with a folded towel and holding it in place with your hands. This will help reduce steam pressure.
  • Red curry paste adds loads of flavor without requiring lots of additional (often hard-to-find) ingredients. Curry pastes can vary from brand to brand, particularly in spiciness. We use Thai Kitchen® which I would say is very mild and has a great flavor. I’ve also used Maesri® red curry paste, which is probably my favorite flavor-wise, but it’s a lot spicier than Thai Kitchen. When making Mango Chicken Curry for my kids, I use Thai Kitchen.

Process shots-- Adding the blended mixture back to the pot; adding the chicken and simmering; stirring in the mango.

Process shots-- Adding the blended mixture back to the pot; adding the chicken and simmering; stirring in the mango.

Serving suggestions

Don’t skip the toppings! They are what pull everything together in this curry!

  • Fresh, finely chopped cilantro adds a burst of freshness. Basil (Thai basil if you can find it) is also a great herb to top this Mango Chicken Curry!
  • Fresh-squeezed lime juice adds a hit of needed acid. 
  • Kaffir lime leaves are one of our favorites. These leaves add a really nice citrusy flavor to this curry. They’re often tricky to find in a mainstream grocery store, so I purchase a bunch at a time and freeze them — they freeze beautifully! If you can’t find these leaves, add in some additional lime zest for an extra punch of citrus flavor.
  •  A scoop of coconut yogurt on top adds some coolness, additional texture, and flavor to the curry.
  • Roti bread is a traditional side for this Thai-inspired curry, but I often have a hard time finding it. So, while not traditional, we love toasted naan or pita to serve on the side. We love Stonefire® naan.
  • Dry-roasted and lightly salted cashews make a nice crunchy topping.

Image of cilantro being mixed into the Mango Chicken Curry and serving it over rice

Image of cilantro being mixed into the Mango Chicken Curry and serving it over rice

STORAGE

Mango Chicken Curry Storage

One of my favorite things about curry recipes is how well they store! Leftovers only get more and more flavorful as they sit. Store any leftover curry in an airtight container in the fridge for 3-5 days. Reheat over low heat, adding a splash of chicken stock/broth or coconut milk as needed to thin the sauce.

Freeze leftovers in an airtight container for up to 3 months. Defrost fully in the fridge before reheating on the stovetop.

Mango Chicken Curry ready to be eaten

Mango Chicken Curry ready to be eaten

More delicious curry recipes

Mango Chicken Curry

This Mango Chicken Curry is more sweet than spicy and bursting with rich flavors. The secret to this delicious curry? Blending mango in the coconut curry sauce and then adding even more mango to the finished curry! 

Mango Chicken Curry

This Mango Chicken Curry is more sweet than spicy and bursting with rich flavors. The secret to this delicious curry? Blending mango in the coconut curry sauce and then adding even more mango to the finished curry! 

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped (1-1/2 cups)
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons each: fresh minced ginger and garlic, coarsely chopped
  • 3 tablespoons red curry paste Note 1
  • 2 teaspoons each: ground coriander, yellow curry powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 2 cups ripe mango Note 2
  • 1 can (13.5 oz.) full-fat coconut milk Note 3
  • 1-1/4 pounds boneless & skinless chicken thighs or breasts, cut into 1-inch pieces (we love thighs best)
  • Optional additions: fresh lime juice & zest, fresh cilantro, 1 tbsp fish sauce, 2-3 kaffir lime leaves
  • For serving: fine sea salt & cooked rice – Note 4

Instructions

  • AROMATICS: Heat the coconut oil in a large pot over medium heat. Once melted/hot, add in the chopped onions and bell pepper. Saute, cooking occasionally until soft about 7-9 minutes. Add garlic and ginger and cook for another minute. Add in the red curry paste, coriander, curry powder, cumin, and salt to taste (I add 1 tsp fine sea salt). Cook, stirring constantly, until very fragrant, 1-3 minutes. Reduce heat slightly and add a touch more oil if anything is sticking too much.

  • BLEND: Add in 1 cup of the mango and cook, stirring constantly for 1 more minute. Vigorously shake the can of coconut milk and pour in the entire can. Increase the heat to high, bring to a boil, and then lower the heat to a low simmer and cook for 10-15 minutes. Meanwhile, cut the chicken into 1-inch cubes. Once the mixture has simmered, carefully transfer the sauce to a blender. Blend the sauce (Note 5) until completely smooth and then return the sauce to the pot.

  • COOK CHICKEN: Heat sauce over medium-low, returning it to a low simmer. Once simmering, add in the chicken, and stir through. Cover the pot with a lid and cook for 8-15 minutes. (Breast pieces are usually done around 8 minutes and thighs closer to 15 minutes — sometimes a little longer depending on size.) Check doneness by using a meat thermometer or cutting open the largest piece of chicken you can find — it should be white throughout.

  • FINISH CURRY: Once the chicken is cooked through, reduce heat to the lowest setting and stir in the remaining 1 cup mango. If using, add in chopped cilantro (we add about 1/3 cup, finely chopped), zest and juice of a lime, fish sauce, and/or kaffir lime leaves if using. Taste and adjust curry seasonings to personal preference. Add salt if needed. If it’s too sweet, add a touch more fish sauce and if it’s not sweet enough, add a touch of sugar — flavors should sing! Serve curry over cooked rice and garnish plates with additional cilantro if desired. Enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Note 1: Red curry paste: Curry pastes can vary from brand to brand, particularly in spiciness. We use Thai Kitchen® which I would say is very mild and has a great flavor. I’ve also used Maesri® red curry paste, which is probably my favorite flavor-wise, but it’s a lot spicier than Thai Kitchen. When making Mango Chicken Curry for my kids, I use Thai Kitchen.

Note 2: Mangos: We love honey mangos (also known as Ataulfo or yellow mangos) best in this recipe, but regular mangos work great as well. (Honey mangos are sweeter and creamier than regular mangos.) To tell if they are ripe, squeeze them gently. If it’s ripe, it will give slightly. For a sweeter curry sauce, wait until the mangos are at peak ripeness. For a less sweet (more spicy) curry sauce, use a slightly more firm mango. We’ve also tested this recipe with frozen mangos and had great results with them. When you can’t always count on finding fresh, ripe mangos at the store, you can count on frozen ones being ripe enough to give this curry great flavor and sweetness. Often frozen mangos are quite large, so while it doesn’t matter how big they are for the 1st cup (it’s getting blended), you may want to chop down the 2nd cup into smaller more bite-sized pieces.

Note 3: Coconut Milk: Look for shelf-stable, not refrigerated, cans of coconut milk. You’ll find canned coconut milk on the international aisle, with Latin or Asian products. Here’s an article outlining the best brands to use. I personally use Imperial Kitchen® since I can find it often at my local grocery store. Use full-fat coconut milk for the best flavor and thickness. Lite coconut milk won’t thicken and give you the rich, full flavor that regular coconut milk will. Cream of coconut is far too sweet and coconut cream tends to be too thick (and overpoweringly coconut flavored) for this curry.

Note 4: FOOLPROOF and delicious basmati rice: 

  • Measure the rice and rinse it in a fine-mesh sieve until the water runs clear.
  • Place the rice in a bowl and cover it with water to soak for about 5-10 minutes.
  • While the rice is soaking, fill a large pot with water and set it to boil.
  • Once the water is at a rolling boil, drain the rice and add it to the pot.
  • Cook without reducing the heat, for 5-6 minutes (taste test a piece to ensure tenderness to preference) and then drain and fluff with a fork.
  • Note that these cooking directions do not work for other rice varieties (long grain, short grain, jasmine, etc.).

Note 5: Blending soup: When blending, make sure to secure the lid on tightly and then select the “soup” or “hot” cycle. Remember that heat expands, so increase speed slowly and watch it carefully to avoid curry sauce exploding out or over. Remove the lid carefully as it will likely release a burst of steam. If your blender doesn’t have a hot/soup setting, you can compensate by replacing the blender lid with a folded towel and holding it in place with your hands. This will help reduce steam pressure.

Nutrition information does not include rice.

Nutrition Facts

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 178kcal | Carbohydrates: 18g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 10g | Saturated Fat: 7g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 27mg | Sodium: 29mg | Potassium: 316mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 14g | Vitamin A: 3607IU | Vitamin C: 71mg | Calcium: 38mg | Iron: 1mg

We do our best to provide accurate nutritional analysis for our recipes. Our nutritional data is calculated using a third-party algorithm and may vary, based on individual cooking styles, measurements, and ingredient sizes. Please use this information for comparison purposes and consult a health professional for nutrition guidance as needed.

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